A treatise on phonology: comprising a perfect alphabet for by Andrew Comstock, Benn Pitman, John M'Lean (M.D.)

By Andrew Comstock, Benn Pitman, John M'Lean (M.D.)

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Additional info for A treatise on phonology: comprising a perfect alphabet for the English language; a specimen exhibition of the absurdities of our present system of orthography; Comstock's, Pitman's, and the Cincinnati alphabet, contrasted; a lecture on phonetics, by Prof.

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E. unmarked, as a morpheme feature in combination with another morpheme. ). I have argued elsewhere (cf. Gvozdanovic 1983 c: 79-80) that an initial falling tone which alternates with the rising tone in the lexical marking can in such cases be seen as unmarked for [±rising]. This absence of distinctive tone is equivalent, phonetically, to an initial falling accent, for this implements a preceding prosodic word boundary, which is always either high or rising in Serbo-Croatian, cf. Gvozdanovic 1980: 99).

Selkirk 1980) to contain a fixed hierarchy of prosodic levels, which are characterized by a constituent structure and distinguished as follows (cf. Kiparsky 1981:245): (1) phonological phrase word foot syllable segment. An element at each level is composed of one or more elements at the next lower level. According to Kiparsky (op. ), "each level is represented in a formally parallel fashion, by means of binary trees, each nonterminal node branching into S(trong) and W(eak)". Hence the term 'prosodic' for this hierarchy.

This can be seen from the occurrence of the falling tonal accents, in the standard language, bound to the initial syllable of the prosodic word (for a discussion of variation in this respect, see Gvozdanovic 1985 a), which in such cases occur on the proclitic, as illustrated below. (6) Syllabification and prosodic word boundaries in Standard Serbo-Croatian: ovcu 'a/the sheep, accusative', [ovcu], is syllabified as [ov-cu]; nad ovcu 'above a/the sheep, accusative', [nädövcu], is syllabified as [näd-öv-cu] Phonological domains 41 (with Ο denoting the long falling tonal accent, (") denoting the short falling tonal accent, (") denoting vowel length, and (-), syllable boundaries).

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